Canada’s Return No Dutch Treat

Forwards JOHN DEVANEY (15, left) and KEVIN PRIMEAU (21, right) park in front of Holland's goal during Canada's 10-1 romp of the Dutch on the opening day of Red Group play at the 1980 Winter Olympics. Both Devaney and Primeau registered a goal for Canada in the match.

Forwards JOHN DEVANEY (15, left) and KEVIN PRIMEAU (21, right) park in front of Holland's goal during Canada's 10-1 romp of the Dutch on the opening day of Red Group play at the 1980 Winter Olympics. Both Devaney and Primeau registered a goal for Canada in the match.

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Five days short of twelve full years, on February 12, 1980, the national ice hockey team of CANADA again stepped out onto Olympic ice at the Winter Games in Lake Placid.

Canada were drawn into the Red Group and scheduled to meet the Olympic new-boys from NETHERLANDS in their noteable return match.

Holland were actually enjoying their finest period of ice hockey in the history of their nation. The Dutch had triumphed at the C Pool of the 1978 IIHF World Championships and then promptly again won the B Pool of the 1979 IIHF event in Galati, Romania; no team in history had ever achieved this before.

The Netherlands were paced by Canadian-born JACK DE HEER, who had led the 1979 B Pool in scoring, as well as another native Canuck, one-time Boston University forward DICK DECLOE of EG Dusseldorf, who was a goal-scoring machine in the West German Bundesliga for years.

Despite the fact that, not including players under contract in the minors, 420 of Canada’s best players were busy skating for professional National Hockey League clubs, for the Dutch at Lake Placid it was still no treat to face the country that had invented the sport of ice hockey.

Holland did score a first period goal through CORKY DE GRAAW, a 28-year-old Dutch national who had skated 72 games (20 go 44 as, 64 pts) for the Long Island Ducks in the old Eastern Hockey League during the 1971-72 season eight years earlier.

Nonetheless, Canada had built a 4-1 advantage at the conclusion of the first two periods heading into the final twenty minutes of play : 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NN1jDIJz9ck&feature=related

After first dumping the puck into the Dutch defensive zone, Canada’s GLENN ANDERSON (9) moves into a dangerous position at the edge of the circle on the left to accept a centering pass from JIM NILL (12).

Although Anderson is at first denied by Holland’s 27-year-old Canadian-born goaltender TED LENSSEN, the Edmonton Oilers’ 1979 fourth round draft pick (# 69 overall) from Denver University is still able collect the rebound and execute the spin-o-rama-slapshot to perfection.

An excited Anderson’s goal announces the start of a six-goal onslaught for Canada on their way to a 10-1 defeat of the Netherlands at Lake Placid.

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