Albertville ’92 : Shootout – Lindros / Puck On Line

18-year-old ERIC LINDROS finished tied for fourth place in scoring at the 1992 Winter Olympic Games in Albertville, France, with 11 points (5 go 6 as) in eight games. Lindros had been drafted number one overall by the Quebec Nordiques of the National Hockey League, but chose to compete for Canada at the Olympics instead and sparked controversy.

18-year-old ERIC LINDROS finished tied for fourth place in scoring at the 1992 Winter Olympic Games in Albertville, France, with 11 points (5 go 6 as) in eight games. Lindros had been drafted number one overall by the Quebec Nordiques of the National Hockey League, but chose to compete for Canada at the Olympics instead and sparked controversy.

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The ice hockey competition was changed to a playoff-style, elimination format for medals from a quarterfinal stage onwards at the 1992 Winter Olympic Games at Albertville, France. Naturally, the very first round of knockout competition for medals at the Olympics necessitated a penalty shot shootout to determine a winner for one of the quarterfinal matches. CANADA and GERMANY made for ironic history-makers, however.

Canada had arrived at the quarterfinals top-seeded from Group B with four wins and one loss in the preliminary round-robin; Germany finished fourth out of six teams in Group A with a record of two wins and three losses.

Canada controlled play overall and outshot the Germans 36-21 for the contest but, critically, did have three goals disallowed by Finnish referee SEPPO MAKELA. In the third period, defenseman KEVIN DAHL’s deflected slapshot changes course a few times through the maze of players to intially put Canada ahead with six minutes to go in the game. But, Germany’s ERNST KOEPF of EC Koeln deflects a puck past Canada goalie SEAN BURKE to produce a 3-3 draw with 2:22 left.

On the heels of a ten-minute overtime period which sees the third apparent Canadian goal overturned it was off to a penalty shot shootout :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9wFPPrA2-Vg&feature=related

Shooters In Clip

  • 17 GER – Gerd TRUNTSCHKA — no goal
  • 16 CAN – Wally SCHREIBER — GOAL
  • 26 GER – Michael RUMRICH — GOAL
  •   9 CAN – Joe JUNEAU — no goal
  • 29 GER – Andreas BROCKMANN — GOAL

Of course, each team finished their guaranteed five shots with two goals apiece, JASON WOOLLEY’s shootout success not being shown on the clip presented.

So, sudden-death for the shootout was required. Unlike at soccer’s World Cup, players who had shot before were permitted to try again. ERIC LINDROS (88), who failed on his first attempt, made the most of his second against German goaltender HELMUT DE RAAF.

Needing a goal, Germany’s PETER DRAISAITL (20) sent a shot which somehow popped out the back of Burke’s pads. Bouncing on edge and rolling ever closer to the goal line, the puck flops and dies square on the goal line.

The whole puck having not crossed the goal line — no goal signals the referee Makela.

Canada advance to the semifinals; Germany are out.

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“That was the most dramatic finish I have ever seen to an international match,” German forward GEORG HOLZMANN was quoted as saying in the New York Times.

“We might have won.”

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