Archive for OG Great Goals

Lake Placid ’32 : Germany Had A Ball

RUDI BALL nets one of his 19 career international goals for Germany

RUDI BALL nets one of his 19 career international goals for Germany

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Seventy-eight years ago on this day, the German national team celebrated the first of its two greatest days of all-time at the Winter Olympics.

The world-wide economic depression had reduced the ice hockey competition at the Lake Placid Games in 1932 to a field of just four teams. Thus, all but one squad were sure to receive an Olympic medal. In spite of all this, the Germans had arrived in upstate New York with legitimate aspirations, anyway, after having won both the silver medal for the World Championships as well as the European title at the 1930 tournament that was started in Chamonix, France, but moved to Berlin as a result of bad weather.

Only two changes had been made to German Aussenkapitan (player-coach) ERICH ROEMER’s team from the 1930 champion squad — the two new players being forwards WERNER KORFF of Schlittschuhclub Berlin and Sportclub Riessersee’s GEORG STROBL.

Germany got its 1932 Winter Games off to the right start with a critical 2-1 defeat of Poland thru a pair of Blitztore (lightning goals) from GUSTAV JAENECKE and MARTIN SCHROETTLE. Jaenecke, a 23-year-old left wing from Schlittschuhclub Berlin, scored nine goals in six games at the 1930 World Championships and entered the Lake Placid tournament Germany’s all-time leading goal-scorer at major international events with 16 goals in 14 games.

As expected, the Germans lost all four contests against the North American continent’s teams. The first of those, a 4-1 defeat at the hands of Canada, was respectable; the pair of losses the silver medalist United States by the combined count of 15-0 was rather disappointing. Nonetheless, one final match with Poland still provided opportunity for the Olympic bronze medal at the III Winter Games for the black-sweatered German sqaud.

The Poles were not prepared to go quietly but, following a scoreless first period, 21-year-old RUDI BALL sent the Germans in front. Poland pulled level two minutes into the third period of play but 120 seconds later Ball, the 5’4″ 140-pound linemate of Jaenecke for both club and country, put Germany back in front. The rookie Strobl shot a third goal for the Fatherland while Ball then bagged his third goal of the game to set the final score at 4-1 for Germany.

For Rudi Ball, who scored one goal in five games for Germany at the 1930 World Championships, it is the break-out match of his distinguished international career. It also marked the very first time a German player performed the ‘hat trick’ at the Winter Olympics. Ball also added two assists at the 1932 Lake Placid Games and was, therefore, involved in five of Germany’s seven total goals at the tournament. 

The bronze medal in 1932 would represent the finest German hour at the Winter Olympics for the better part of the next half century.

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Lillehammer ’94 : Penalty-Shot Finale In Photos / On Film (Complete Shootout Clip)

94ogforsberg-hirschforsberg6forsbergstamp5102214P CANADA V SWEDEN

  • IMAGE # 1 : Sweden’s PETER FORSBERG (21) scores his first goal of the shootout against Canada’s COREY HIRSCH (1)
  • IMAGE # 2 : Forsberg’s spectacular one-handed second goal
  • IMAGE # 3 : The Swedish postage stamp commemorating Forsberg’s gold medal-winner at the Lillehammer Games
  • IMAGE # 4 : Sweden goaltender TOMMY SALO (35) saves from Canada’s PAUL KARIYA (9) on the last shot in sudden-death

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WH presents the dramatic penalty-shot shootout (in two parts) between CANADA and SWEDEN to settle the Gold Medal Match at the 1994 Winter Olympic Games in Lillehammer, Norway :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbjbYT3mg4Q&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bar2N-8AtBw&feature=related

The shooters for SWEDEN :

  • # 12 — Hakan LOOB ————- (33) – BK Farjestad Karlstad
  • #   8 — Magnus SVENSSON — (30) – IF Leksands
  • # 26 — Mats NASLUND ———- (34) – IF Malmo 
  • # 21 — Peter FORSBERG —— (20) – Mo Do Ornskoldsvik
  • # 11 — Roger HANSSON ——– (26) – IF Malmo

In order, Svensson and Forsberg handled the Swedish attempts in the sudden-death phase of the shootout.

The shooters for CANADA :

  • # 93 — Petr NEDVED — (38 goals for Vancouver Canucks in 92-93)
  • #   9 — Paul KARIYA — (college player of the year at Univ. of Maine)
  • # 10 — Dwayne NORRIS — (25 goals in 50 AHL games in 92-93)
  • # 22 — Greg PARKS — (IF Leksands of Sweden’s Elitserien)
  • # 12 — Greg JOHNSON — (three-time All-American at North Dakota Univ)

Nedved, and then Kariya, took Canada’s chances in sudden-death.

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Innsbruck ’76 : Epic Finale / USSR vs CSSR

kharlamov_valeri01Yakushev2

Two goals inside of 24 seconds from VALERY KHARLAMOV (left) and ALEXANDER YAKUSHEV (right) with under five minutes remaining lifted the USSR to a dramatic 4-3 decision over Czechoslovakia on the final day at the 1976 Winter Olympic Games in Innsbruck, Austria.

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As classic a de facto Gold Medal Match as Olympic history has to offer…

Ever since half a million soldiers from the armies of the SOVIET UNION and other Warsaw Pact nations invaded CZECHOSLOVAKIA back in 1968, international sporting events between the two nations had soared to new heights for intensity as well as competitiveness — especially in ice hockey. 

Even before the decisive final twenty minutes at the finale of the 1976 Winter Olympic tournament, one cannot say that Czechoslovakia did not have ample opportunity to defeat the Soviet Union and deliver a powerful message of symbolic revenge in the final game at Innsbruck.

At the clash of Eastern-bloc arch-rivals and contemporary international ice hockey powerhouses in the Austrian Alps, the USSR were shooting for a fourth consecutive set of gold medals at the Winter Games; Czechoslovakia were coveting the first Olympic title in their nation’s history.

The Czechoslovaks, in fact, were already leading 2-0 thru centers MILAN NOVY (6) and IVAN HLINKA (10) midway through the second period when a glorious chance arrived. A pair of Soviets in the box gave Czechoslovakia a 5-on-3 power play which, however, went by the boards thanks to the noteable efforts of USSR center VLADIMIR SHADRIN (19) as well as defensemen YURI LIAPKIN (5) and GENNADY TSYGANKOV (7) on the penalty-kill.

Having earned the reprieve, the Soviets thereafter responded with goals from Shadrin and fellow centerman VLADIMIR PETROV (16) to knot the match and leave all to play for in the third period.

Czechoslovakia’s JIRI HOLOCEK (2) and the USSR’s VLADISLAV TRETIAK (20) each managed to keep all pucks out over the first half of the last period.

It is at this point that the uninterupted footage presented by WORLD HOCKEY begins, with roughly ten minutes left in the third at the OLYMPIA EISHALLE in Innsbruck and the score level at USSR 2 – CSSR 2 :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMtNnAGQowc&feature=PlayList&p=39223EECA14DEC79&playnext=1&playnext_from=PL&index=4

Roughly a 1:20 into the clip, the Czechoslovak captain and center of a doping scandal at Innsbruck, FRANTISEK POSPISIL (7), collects a Soviet clearance in his own end and skates the puck well behind his own net before embarking on a mid-ice rush. At the red line, the defenseman squares the puck for his streaking SONP Kladno teammate EDUARD NOVAK (22).

Once inside the Soviet zone and seemingly surrounded, the 29-year-old right wing quickly fires a wrist-shot that appears to take a deflection off of defenseman ALEANDER GUSEV (2) and fool Tretiak in the USSR goal. An indelible, if premature, celebration from Novak ensues. The Czechoslovaks are now nine minutes less two seconds from the Olympic gold medal.

A few minutes later, Czechoslovak will critically fail to widen their lead, however. At the 4:35 mark of the clip, the veteran Olympian JIRI HOLIK (20) circles his own cage and heads down the right on a rink-length rush before deftly dishing the disc to BOHUSLAV STASTNY (12). Although at first apparently beaten, the catllike Tretiak is able to thwart the Tesla Pardubice wing with a last-ditch dive and literally save the game for the USSR.

This stop proves to be absolutely critical for, soon, the Soviet Union will immediately strike back after the go-ahead goal-scorer Novak is sent to the penalty box with less than six minutes to play for a foul on BORIS MIKHAILOV (13) along the left wing boards.

The Czechoslovaks do not appear to be in such bad shape on the penalty-kill until Tysgankov pulls a smart move in front of his pursuer Novy’s bench and sends the speeding VIKTOR SHALIMOV (9) the puck. A procession of drop passes among Spartak players produces a goal-mouth scramble. Finally, Shalimov is able to poke the puck across to ALEXANDER YAKUSHEV (15) on the right and, in an instant, the game is tied.

Considering the earlier victory at Innsbruck Czechoslovakia were made to forfeit on account of Pospisil’s failed drug test following the Poland match, a draw was enough to do the deal for the Soviets in their last match.

Within a scant 24 seconds, however, the result was rendered beyond doubt in the Gold Medal Match at Innsbruck.

Petrov controls an offensive zone face-off and immediately slips the puck past defenseman JIRI BUBLA (19) to a wide-open VALERY KHARLAMOV (17) in front of the Czechoslovak goal. With Holocek now caught out of position, the whole of the net is at the CSKA Moscow left wing’s mercy. Kharlamov makes no mistake as the USSR surge suddenly ahead.

Four minutes minus one second still remain to be contested but it is almost immediately evident that the Czechoslovaks’ spirit has been effectively eliminated by the Soviets’ lightning-quick, consecutive goals in the second half of the third period.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=EdVRAJUv7aU&feature=PlayList&p=CC82D1F23532925D&index=14

The Soviets begin to practice some possession hockey in earnest and, thus, severely crimp Czechoslovakia’s chances for the two goals the blue helmets now require to take the gold medal.

In fact, it is the Soviets who have all the best opportunities the rest of the way; a single long wrist shot from Novak easily swept aside by Tretiak with under a minute to go summarized Czechoslovakia’s  most dangerous counterattack.

After the CSKA Moscow puck tamer turned away a desperation drive from outside the blueline by OLDRICH MACHAC (4) in the waning moments, the USSR’s run of Olympic supremacy since 1964 remained in tact.

For the fifth time in six appearances at the Winter Games, the Soviet Union are Olympic ice hockey champions.

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Additional highlight footage from the 1976 de facto Gold Medal Match at the Olympia Eishalle in Innsbruck.

The slow-motion shots of the third Soviet goal provides a different angle for the viewing connoisseur.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=X2c0fLOOSYE&feature=related

The uninhibited frustration to be found on the faces of the Czechoslovaks at their bench following Yakushev’s tying goal is rather insightful, as well.

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Six Unanswered Spurred U.S. Sextet

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (red shirts, blue pants) face-off against the UNITED STATES (white shirts, red pants) on the final day of competition at the 1960 Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley.

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (red shirts, blue pants) face-off against the UNITED STATES (white shirts, red pants) on the final day of competition at the 1960 Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley.

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The UNITED STATES, after consecutive wins over Canada and the Soviet Union, still had to face CZECHOSLOVAKIA in a final, early morning match at the 1960 Winter Olympic Games at Squaw Valley.

Several Americans were reportedly so excited after the USSR win that they had trouble sleeping prior to their final game. United States JACK MCCARTAN, the unquestionable star of the last two U.S. shows, is said to have “seen nothing but flying pucks at him all night”. Perhaps a bit nervous, McCartan and the United States conceded a goal after just eight seconds the next morning to start the match with Czechoslovakia.

MIROSLAV VLACH’s goal still sets the record for fastest goal to start an Olympic ice hockey game.

A wild first period produced six goals and a 3-3 draw; matters settled in the second stanza, however, the United States again fell behind after Vlach scored his second goal of the game and eighth at the Olympics to put Czechoslovakia ahead 4-3 with twenty minutes to play.

After receiving a surprise visitor to the locker room bearing news of a secret weapon, the United States took to the ice for the final time at Squaw Valley and produced the most stunning third period ever seen at the Winter Olympic Games.

Six minutes in, ROGER CHRISTIAN grabbed the first of what would be SIX unanswered goals for the United States. A little over a minute and a half later, BOB CLEARY, who had a pair of goals for the game, put the Americans ahead to stay. Three goals in sixty-seven seconds later put the final nails in Czechoslovakia’s coffin.

Unbeaten and untied after all seven games, the unheraled United States, who had placed seventh at the previous year’s IIHF World Championships, accepted the very first set of gold medals for ice hockey at the Winter Olympics in their nation’s history.

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BILL CLEARY, Bob’s brother, added a goal for the United States in the 9-4 final day triumph over Czechoslovakia at Squaw Valley. The 25-year-old former Harvard University forward finished third in scoring at the 1960 Winter Olympics with seven goals and 14 points in seven games.

ROGER CHRISTIAN’s four-score effort against the Czechoslovaks is easily the modern record for most goals in an Olympic Gold Medal Match. Christian, whose brother, Bill, finished fourth in scoring at the Squaw Valley tournament with two goals and 13 points, led the United States with eight goals in 1960.

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Laine Lowers Boom On Canada

ERKKI LAINE, a member of both the 1984 and 1988 Finnish Olympic teams, was the top goal-scorer in Sweden's elite league for IF Leksands in 1980-81 and BK Farjestad Karlstad in 1984-85. Laine also led Finland's second division in goals for Reipas Lahti during the 1975-76 season.

ERKKI LAINE, a member of both the 1984 and 1988 Finnish Olympic teams, was the top goal-scorer in Sweden's elite league for IF Leksands in 1980-81 and BK Farjestad Karlstad in 1984-85. Laine also led Finland's second division in goals for Reipas Lahti during the 1975-76 season.

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A solitary goal versus Poland on in the opening match and struggles to score against Switzerland on their second outing should have served as some kind of warning CANADA were fit to be taken as the host nation faced-off with FINLAND on the third day of Group B round-robin play at the 1988 Winter Olympic Games in Calgary.

The Finns, themselves, had actually stumbled against the Swiss in a 2-1 loss on opening day. This result left Finland feeling a bit behind the eight-ball, perhaps, in a B pool which also included the medal contenders from Sweden.

And so, it was a Swedish elite league player, ERKKI LAINE (17) of BK Farjestad Karlstad, who came out firing with a pair of goals in the first period of Finland’s match with Canada :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DiQBfGMwcCg

Ex-New York Ranger RAIMO HELMINEN (14) of Ilves Tampere, one of six former NHL players in Finland’s line-up, was the architect of both of Laine’s goals.

Leading the Finnish charge down the right wing on a two-on-one opposed by Canada’s NHL defenseman TIM WATTERS (2) of the Winnipeg Jets, Helminen hands Laine a perfect saucer pass for the right-handed shooting left wing to one-time past SEAN BURKE in the Canadian goal roughly thirteen minutes into the contest.

Less than two minutes later, Helminen again heads a rush, this time on the left, into the Canadian zone and drops the puck to the trailing Laine. The 31-year-old two-time Swedish Elitserien goal-scoring champion, hooked from behind, cuts back into the slot and releases a wrist shot that somehow works its way through the legs of Burke.

Finland added a third goal in the final minute of the first period and never looked back on the road to a critical 3-1 round-robin victory over Canada.

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Cortina ’56 : USSR – YouTube Footage

The very first Olympic champion ice hockey squad from the USSR

The very first Olympic champion ice hockey squad from the USSR

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The Soviet Union sent its first ever Olympic team to the Winter Games at Cortina d’Ampezzo in the Italian Alps in 1956.

The New York Times would write at the conclusion of the games, “There is one area where the Russians have shown results bordering on the impossible and that area is ice hockey.”

The USSR won all seven of their games and outscored their opposition 40 goals to nine on the way to their historic first set of Olympic gold medals.

WORLD HOCKEY presents a 2:31 clip featuring the Soviets in action against both the United States and Canada in their final two games :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kip6pMfIn3o

In the first minute of the clip, the Soviets skate against white-shirted Canada on the final day. The USSR prevailed 2-0, largely on the strength of the stocking-capped NIKOLAI PUCHKOV in goal.

Following, in color, are highlights from the Soviet Union’s 4-0 win over the United States. The big hit on Soviet star VSEVOLOD BOBROV (9) at the 1:08 mark is worth the look.

The last minute or so, again in color, returns to the USSR – Canada match.

At the 1:57 mark, Dynamo Moscow’s VALENTIN KUZIN (12) seals Canada’s fate with the second Soviet goal, which comes just 37 seconds into the third period of play.

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Sarajevo ’84: Kozhevnikov Recaptures Gold

ALEXANDER KOZHEVNIKOV (29) scored the goal that gave the Soviet Union their sixth set of Olympic gold medals for ice hockey. Kozhevnikov, who collected another gold medal at the Calgary Games in 1988, played briefly in the West for the Durham Wasps in Great Britain as well as AIK Stockholm in Sweden.

ALEXANDER KOZHEVNIKOV (29) scored the goal that gave the Soviet Union their sixth set of Olympic gold medals for ice hockey. Kozhevnikov, who collected another gold medal at the Calgary Games in 1988, played briefly in the West for the Durham Wasps in Great Britain as well as AIK Stockholm in Sweden.

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Sarajevo, 1984. The final day of the medal round at the ice hockey competition. For the third time in four tournaments at the Winter Games, the winner-take-all clash between Eastern bloc arch-rivals CZECHOSLOVAKIA and the SOVIET UNION will determine the Olympic champion.

Both the white-shirted Czechoslovaks and the traditionally red-shirted Soviets enter the match unbeaten and untied seeking to erase disappointing memories from the Lake Placid Games four years prior. Each side boast a balanced squad featuring explosive offense and stingy defense; the Czechoslovaks benefited from the switch to Sparta Prague’s JAROMIR SINDEL in goal following their Olympic opener versus Norway. The USSR, meanwhile, has enjoyed the burst of form from CSKA Moscow right wing NIKOLAI DROZDETSKY (13), who has tallied 10 goals from six games at Sarajevo thus far.

Six and a half minutes in, the Soviets stamp their authority on the game.

Shortly after Drozdetsky misses a wide-open net, the Soviet regroup in center ice as ALEXANDER KOZHEVNIKOV (29) gathers a pass from VIKTOR TUMENEV (28) at the red line and charges the Czechoslovak blue line. Confronted by a pair of defensemen, the 25-year-old Spartak Moscow wing winds up and deploys an always un-Soviet-like slapshot. The puck catches the crossbar and ricochets off Sindel’s shoulder into the Czechoslovak net for a 1-0 Soviet lead :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAD51MXcXjI&feature=related

A little over a minute into the second period, VLADIMIR KRUTOV added a second Soviet goal which proved to be surplus to requirements with USSR goaltender VLADISLAV TRETIAK absorbing 21 Czechoslovak shots for the game.

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Although a regular top goal-scorer in the Soviet elite league, Kozhevnikov never did command a regular place with the USSR national team. Despite six goals at the 1982 IIHF World Championships in Finland, the would-be Calgary Flames’ NHL draft pick (1985, 11th round, # 227 overall) did not make the Soviet team for the 1983 IIHF event in West Germany. For his career, the native of Penza appeared at four major international tournaments (24 ga, 10 go 9 as, 19 pts) for the Soviet Union.

Kozhevnikov finished among the top scorers at Sarajevo with three goals and nine points in seven games.

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Minnesota’s Mayasich Hat Trick Hero

JohnnyMayasich-1jm

JOHN MAYASICH — University of Minnesota

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After seven failed attempts, including the meeting at the 1920 Summer  Games in Antwerp, Belgium, the Unites States finally defeated their neighbors to the north, Canada, at the Olympics in 1956 at Cortina d’Ampezzo.

The architect of the United States offense in the historic 4-1 win over Canada was JOHN MAYASICH, who provided the margin of victory with three goals. Mayasich was gifted one goal in the Italian Alps by Canadian goaltender DENIS BRODEUR, who allowed a puck lofted high in the air from the three-time All-America at the University of Minnesota  to somehow elude him and land in the net — Mayasich had been seeking a line change. The match was played at night in an outdoor arena; Brodeur lost the puck in the lights.

Mayasich finished the top scorer for the silver medalist United States at the Cortina Games with seven goals and 10 points in seven games.

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Finns And Swedes – Rivalry Ratched Up

LAURI MONONEN scored the goal for Finland that wrecked arch-rival Sweden's medal hopes at the 1972 Winter Olympic Games in Sapporo, Japan. Mononen later skated two seasons in the World Hockey Association for the Phoenix Roadrunners in the mid-1970s before signing to play with SC Bern in Switzerland.

LAURI MONONEN scored the goal for Finland that wrecked arch-rival Sweden's medal hopes at the 1972 Winter Olympic Games in Sapporo, Japan. Mononen later skated two seasons in the World Hockey Association for the Phoenix Roadrunners in the mid-1970s before signing to play with SC Bern in Switzerland.

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SWEDEN and FINLAND first met at a major international tournament for ice hockey in 1949 at the International Ice Hockey Federation World Championships held in Stockholm. The far-more experienced Swedes, skating on home ice, flattened the Finns 12-1. Thereafter, Swedish domination of their Scandinavian neighbor would continue for some time…

At the 1972 Sapporo Games in Japan, Sweden’s chances for the silver medal appeared to be rather promising as the Winter Olympic ice hockey tournament arrived at it’s conclusion :

  • 3-0-1 — 7 pts : + 17 — SOVIET UNION
  • 3-1-0 — 6 pts : + 16 — CZECHOSLOVAKIA
  • 2-1-1 — 5 pts :   + 5 — SWEDEN
  • 2-2-0 — 4 pts :    - 2 — UNITED STATES
  • 1-3-0 — 2 pts :  - 11 — FINLAND 
  • 0-4-0 — 0 pts :  - 25 — POLAND

Czechoslovakia were slated to meet their old adversaries from the Soviet Union in the very last match; the very same USSR who are the defending World / Olympic champion nine years running now. The United States would skate with the Poles, who were winless, to start the final day. In between, the Swedes would face their traditional rivals, the Finns.

Irrespective of the Americans’ result, the Swedes could secure the silver with a victory over Suomi coupled with a Soviet defeat of the Czechoslovaks.

For the Finns and Swedes, the engagement in Japan would mark the 24th meeting of the two nations at major international events. Sweden had won 18 of the first twenty-three matches and tied three others. The Finns were improving, though, and had finally registered a pair of victories at the World Championships within the past few years leading up to the Sapporo Games.

The next-door neighbors had met three times previously at the Winter Olympics — Sweden sweeping all three matches and outscoring Finland 21-3 with the average margin of victory at six goals per game.

Any Finnish disappointment left over from the loss to the United States in the previous game, however, dissipated immediately after HEIKKI JARN put his name on the scoresheet versus Sweden roughly three minutes into the Finns’ final match.

Backed by two goals from BJORN PALMQVIST, the Swedes staked a 3-2 lead after two periods. But more than halfway thru the third and final frame, disaster would strike Tre Kronor’s ship. Finland’s MATTI KEINONEN scored at 12:43 and was followed two minutes and fifteen seconds later by LAURI MONONEN.

When Sweden failed to put another puck past JORMA VALTONEN, Finland had pulled off an important if improbable upset at the Winter Olympics over the “dear enemy”.

The loss had drastic consequences for the Swedes. The United States had already defeated Poland as expected. After the Soviet Union, indeed, dumped Czechoslovakia 5-2, Sweden were shut out of the medals entirely.

The Finns, no doubt, were not upset with their neighbor’s misfortune.

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JUHANI TAMMINEN, who scored Finland’s second goal of the match, also later spent two seasons in the old World Hockey Association. Tamminen played for the Cleveland Crusaders during the 1975-76 season and was Mononen’s teammate in Phoenix the following year.

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Lake Placid ’80 : Baker’s Big Goal Salvages Sweden

BILL BAKER fires a shot for the University of Minnesota against their in-state rivals, the University of Minnesota-Duluth, in WCHA play. Baker was an All-American defenseman for the Golden Gophers his senior season of 1978-79 and represented the United States at the 1979 IIHF World Championships in Moscow.

BILL BAKER fires a shot for the University of Minnesota against their in-state rivals, the University of Minnesota-Duluth, in WCHA play. Baker was an All-American defenseman for the Golden Gophers his senior season of 1978-79 and represented the United States at the 1979 IIHF World Championships in Moscow.

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The UNITED STATES goaltender is seated with the rest of the blue shirts on the end of the bench.

The American net is left unguarded, lifted in favor off an extra skater with the upcoming faceoff at the other end.

Forty-one seconds remain in the match with SWEDEN, which comes a day before the official opening ceremony of the 1980 Winter Olympic Games in Lake Placid, New York.

Although the United States win the draw, the shot from the point is blocked by a sliding Swede. After the puck is sent along the boards behind the net, Sweden, indeed, have their chance to clear. The University of Minnesota-Duluth’s MARK PAVELICH steals the disc, however, and delivers a pass to the top of the slot : 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HUrIcAxUEa0&feature=related

The University of Minnesota’s BILL BAKER is on hand to hammer the puck past a partially-screened PELLE LINDBERGH in the Swedish goal to lift the United States level at 2-2.

For the Americans, the tie felt more like a victory.

United States coach HERB BROOKS had calculated prior to the tournament that the squad would require two points from its first two Blue Division matches with Sweden and Czechoslovakia in order to have any real opportunity to advance to the medal round.

The United States entered the 1980 Winter Games at Lake Placid seeded seventh out of twelve teams; Sweden were ranked third.

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