Archive for NCAA – Yale

Bulldogs Blitz Crimson Under Bright Lights On Broadway


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Harvard University right wing KYLE CRISCUOLO (11), the 21-year-old sophomore from Southampton, New Jersey, who is the second-leading scorer for the Crimson with eight goals in 16 NCAA games this season, tries his luck from behind the goal line with a backhander on Yale University backstop ALEX LYON, the 21-year-old freshman from Baudette, Minnesota, who has established himself as the Bulldogs first choice between the posts this term, during the ECAC Conference match-up of historical Ivy League adversaries at Madison Square Garden in New York City.
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Three goals scored inside the first six minutes of the second period, including a stunning pair netted within twenty-six seconds of one another, and suffocating defensive work the rest of the way enabled the reigning NCAA national champions to prevail at the World’s Most Famous Arena as YALE outscored traditional arch-rival HARVARD 5-1 in the 239th installment of what has been dubbed the “RIVALRY ON ICE”.

Fitting enough for such a high profile match featuring two iconic Ivy League powerhouses (at least as far as the academic world is concerned) that it was, indeed, an ice hockey player appropriately named CODY LEARNED whose two goals certainly proved to be most pivotal for the Yale Bulldogs in the contest played before the noteworthy crowd of 15,524 paying customers at Madison Sqaure Garden in New York City.

Canadian legionnaire RAPHAEL GIRARD had been sensational in stopping 52 shots as the Crimson held their eternal enemy to a 2-2 tie the last time the two fierce foes had faced off at the unique Yale Whale only a little more than a month ago. And the 22-year-old senior goaltender imported from St. Hyacinthe in Quebec had done well to keep out a baker’s dozen efforts in the first twenty minutes of play on Broadway, as well. But a lethal pair of strikes from the ambitious Learned sandwiched around a goal from Bulldogs defenseman GUS YOUNG, the 22-year-old senior from Dedham, Massachusetts, who was selected by the Colorado Avalanche in the seventh round (# 184 overall) of the 2009 National Hockey League Draft, forced the Harvard starter to the bench rather early in the middle frame.

Now, Learned made just eight appearances for the would-be NCAA national champions as a 21-year-old freshman coming out of Amherst, New Hampshire, last season and had skated in only eight of Yale’s first fourteen games this term heading into this nationally broadcast match with Harvard on Broadway. But two goals for the blue-shirted team at Madison Square Garden not only doubled Learned’s career total for the Bulldogs, it also made certain that the Crimson had been effectively schooled in New York City. And so, yet again, truth has shown itself to be stranger than fiction, if only in the wonderful world of Ivy League ice hockey.

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Yale University captain JESSE ROOT (20), the reliable senior center from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who missed the Bulldogs’ last Ivy League clash with the Crimson at the David S. Ingalls Rink in New Haven about a month ago on account of injury, carries the puck against arch-rival Harvard University during the 239th edition of the so-called “Rivalry On Ice” at the world famous Madison Square Garden in New York City.
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January 11, 2014
Madison Square Garden – Manhattan, New York
Attendance : 15,524

YALE 5 – HARVARD 1

04:23 … YALE – Doherty (Wilson)
10:51 … HRV – Vesey (Esposito, Kerfoot) – ppg
22:35 … YALE – Learned (Izmirlian, O’Gara)
25:15 … YALE – Young (Doherty, Day)
25:41 … YALE – Learned (Obuchowski, Izmirlian)
51:14 … YALE – Agostino (Young)

shots-on-goal : Yale 34 (12 + 12 + 10) – Harvard 24 (14 + 6 + 4)

penalty minutes : Yale 8 – Harvard 6

HARVARD : Girard (Michalek 25:42) – Everson, McNally ; Bergin, Flick ; Guiltnan, Ford – Vesey, Malone, Hart ; Zielonka, Kerfoot, Criscuolo ; Valek, Esposito, Moy ; Tringale, McGregor, Jaw

YALE : Lyon – Young, O’Gara ; Fallen, Obuchowski ; Witek, Killian – Weberg, Root, Agostino ; Doherty, Izmirlian, Learned ; Ruffolo, Cooper, Hayden ; DiChiara, Wilson, Day

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Harvard & Yale : The All-Time Record


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Only because the blog cares about history, presented here would be every location along with every result of every single contest from the traditional Ivy League clash which has been formally dubbed the “RIVALRY ON ICE” … (HARVARD still rank well ahead of eternal enemy YALE in the all-time series record between the two schools as the Crimson count 141 wins against 77 losses and 20 ties in the 238 hockey games played with the Bulldogs, to date) :

02/26/1900 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 4 …… New York, NY
02/11/1901 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… New York, NY
02/15/1902 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… New York, NY
03/14/1902 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 3 …… New York, NY
03/17/1902 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 1 …… New York, NY
02/21/1903 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 0 …… New York, NY
02/27/1903 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
02/28/1903 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 1 …… New York, NY
02/22/1904 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
02/27/1904 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… New York, NY
02/18/1905 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 1 …… New York, NY
02/17/1906 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… New York, NY
02/16/1907 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
02/15/1908 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New York, NY
02/20/1909 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 0 …… New York, NY
02/19/1910 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 0 …… New York, NY
02/18/1911 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
02/17/1912 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/21/1912 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
02/24/1912 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/01/1913 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/19/1913 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
02/07/1914 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
02/11/1914 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/04/1914 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… New York, NY
01/30/1915 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/23/1915 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/12/1916 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/26/1916 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
02/17/1917 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
03/03/1917 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/10/1917 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
02/08/1919 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… New York, NY
01/17/1920 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 4 …… Cambridge
02/21/1920 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 0 …… Philadelphia, PA
02/05/1921 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 0 …… Philadelphia, PA
02/28/1921 …… Harvard 13 – Yale 1 ….. Cambridge
02/11/1922 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/25/1922 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
01/20/1923 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
03/03/1923 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 0 …… Cambridge
03/07/1923 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/09/1924 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 0 …… Cambridge
03/01/1924 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
01/17/1925 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/14/1925 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/25/1925 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 0 …… Cambridge
02/13/1926 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/27/1926 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 0 …… New York, NY
02/19/1927 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/26/1927 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/25/1928 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/03/1928 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/03/1929 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/09/1929 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
03/13/1929 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/01/1930 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
03/08/1930 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… Boston, MA
03/12/1930 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/28/1931 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/07/1931 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/27/1932 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/05/1932 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
03/09/1932 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 4 …… New Haven
02/25/1933 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/04/1933 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/08/1933 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
02/23/1934 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
03/03/1934 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
03/07/1934 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 4 …… New Haven
03/02/1935 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/09/1935 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/13/1935 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/16/1936 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/07/1936 …… Harvard 11 – Yale 0 ….. New Haven
02/27/1937 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
03/06/1937 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/05/1938 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/10/1938 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
02/17/1939 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
03/04/1939 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
03/02/1940 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/09/1940 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/01/1941 …… Yale 8 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
03/09/1941 …… Yale 8 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/27/1942 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/08/1942 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
03/06/1943 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
03/10/1943 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
02/09/1946 …… Yale 9 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
03/01/1947 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 4 …… Cambridge
03/08/1947 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
03/06/1948 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
03/13/1948 …… Harvard 1 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/17/1948 …… Yale 10 – Harvard 3 ….. New Haven
03/05/1949 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/12/1949 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
03/04/1950 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/11/1950 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/03/1951 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/10/1951 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/01/1952 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
03/08/1952 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/23/1953 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/07/1953 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
02/27/1954 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
03/06/1954 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 5 …… Cambridge
02/26/1955 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/05/1955 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/03/1956 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
03/10/1956 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
03/02/1957 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/09/1957 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… New Haven
03/01/1958 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
03/08/1958 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/26/1959 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/07/1959 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
02/27/1960 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 0 …… New Haven
03/05/1960 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/25/1961 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/04/1961 …… Harvard 1 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/24/1962 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/03/1962 …… Harvard 9 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
02/23/1963 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 5 …… Cambridge
03/02/1963 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 0 …… New Haven
02/29/1964 …… Harvard 12 – Yale 2 ….. New Haven
03/07/1964 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Boston, MA
02/27/1965 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… Cambridge
03/06/1965 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 4 …… New Haven
01/01/1966 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… Buffalo, NY
02/26/1966 …… Yale 8 – Harvard 5 …… New Haven
03/05/1966 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 5 …… Cambridge
02/25/1967 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
03/04/1967 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
02/24/1968 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/02/1968 …… Harvard 9 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
02/22/1969 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/01/1969 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
02/28/1970 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… New York, NY
03/07/1970 …… Harvard 9 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/26/1971 …… Harvard 11 – Yale 4 ….. Cambridge
03/06/1971 …… Harvard 11 – Yale 2 ….. New Haven
02/26/1972 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
03/04/1972 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 4 …… Cambridge
02/24/1973 …… Harvard 9 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
03/03/1973 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… New Haven
02/23/1974 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/02/1974 …… Harvard 10 – Yale 3 ….. Cambridge
02/28/1974 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 3 …… Detroit, MI
02/22/1975 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/01/1975 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
02/28/1976 …… Harvard 9 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
03/06/1976 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/26/1977 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/05/1977 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
02/25/1978 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
03/04/1978 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… Cambridge
02/10/1979 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Boston, MA
03/09/1979 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
02/23/1980 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 6 …… New Haven, CT
03/01/1980 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 4 …… Cambridge
02/14/1981 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/21/1981 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
02/06/1982 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
02/20/1982 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
02/05/1983 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven, CT
02/19/1983 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
02/04/1984 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
02/18/1984 …… Harvard 1 – Yale 1 …… New Haven, CT
11/17/1984 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
02/01/1985 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
11/15/1985 …… Yale 7 – Harvard 5 …… New Haven
01/31/1986 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/15/1986 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 3 …… Boston, MA
11/15/1986 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
01/13/1987 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
11/17/1987 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
01/17/1988 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
11/11/1988 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
01/31/1989 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
11/10/1989 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
01/12/1990 …… Harvard 11 – Yale 0 ….. Cambridge
11/10/1990 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
01/12/1991 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
11/23/1991 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/07/1992 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
11/21/1992 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
02/12/1993 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
11/12/1993 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 0 …… Cambridge
12/11/1993 …… Harvard 12 – Yale 1 ….. New Haven
11/11/1994 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 2 …… New Haven
02/04/1995 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
11/17/1995 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/09/1996 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 5 …… New Haven
11/15/1996 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
02/07/1997 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
11/15/1997 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
02/14/1998 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
03/21/1998 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Lake Placid, NY
11/21/1998 …… Yale 7 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
02/12/1999 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
01/07/2000 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/26/2000 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… New Haven
01/13/2001 …… Yale 3 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/02/2001 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 4 …… Cambridge
03/09/2001 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 4 …… New Haven, CT
03/10/2001 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 4 …… New Haven, CT
01/11/2002 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
03/01/2001 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
12/07/2002 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
01/10/2003 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
11/15/2003 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
02/06/2004 …… Harvard 7 – Yale 5 …… New Haven
11/12/2004 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
01/29/2005 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
11/18/2005 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
12/04/2005 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
11/18/2006 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/16/2007 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/03/2007 …… Harvard 5 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
03/04/2007 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
11/28/2007 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 3 …… New Haven
02/22/2008 …… Harvard 6 – Yale 1 …… Cambridge
01/10/2009 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/06/2009 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
01/12/2010 …… Harvard 3 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
02/06/2010 …… Yale 6 – Harvard 3 …… New Haven
01/08/2011 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 2 …… Cambridge
02/04/2011 …… Yale 1 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
01/27/2012 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
02/18/2012 …… Yale 7 – Harvard 1 …… New Haven
03/03/2012 …… Yale 2 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
03/10/2012 …… Harvard 4 – Yale 3 …… Cambridge
03/11/2012 …… Harvard 8 – Yale 2 …… Cambridge
11/03/2012 …… Yale 5 – Harvard 1 …… Cambridge
01/13/2013 …… Yale 4 – Harvard 0 …… New Haven
12/07/2013 …… Harvard 2 – Yale 2 …… New Haven

NOTES — The designation “New Haven, CT” indicates the Yale – Harvard game was contested at the NEW HAVEN VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM, which was constructed well after the unique YALE WHALE (DAVID S. INGALLS RINK) and is considered to be a ‘neutral’ site for simplistic purposes here. Similarly, the designation “Boston, MA” indicates that the Crimson and Bulldogs skated in Beantown at the original BOSTON GARDEN with one notable exception. The Harvard – Yale game in February of 1979 was hosted by the WALTER BROWN ARENA on the campus of Boston University.

Harvard and Yale have actually engaged at a few different arenas in different parts of New York City. The inaugural Crimson – Bulldogs ice hockey match was, of course, played at the historical ST. NICHOLAS RINK (only the second indoor arena in the entire United States to ever use mechanically frozen ice for its surface) in Manhattan. The two Ivy League schools also faced-off against one another at the old BROOKLYN ICE PALACE in February of 1919 before meeting for very first time at the world famous MADISON SQUARE GARDEN on February 27, 1926.

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E.C.A.C. Conference Overall Standings & Upcoming Schedule


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Union College Canadian legionnaire ELI LICHTENWALD (12), the sizable freshman (6’6″ 235 lbs) from Saskatoon Saskatchewan who has totaled thirteen points (seven goals) in his first eleven NCAA contests, outpaces countryman KELLEN JONES (15) of Quinnipiac University, the undersized (5’9″ 165 lbs) senior center who was chosen in the seventh round (# 202 overall) of the 2010 National Hockey League Draft by the Edmonton Oilers, and prepares to close out this pivotal ECAC Conference clash by scoring into the empty net at the Frank L. Messa Rink in Schenectady, New York, on December 7, 2013.
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As the short winter break that will conclude a couple of days after Christmas continues, the EASTERN COLLEGIATE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE features three teams at the tail end of the nation’s Top Ten according to the latest “PairWise Comparison Ratings” chart, which is constantly updated by the standout citizens at College Hockey News. (www.collegehockeynews.com)

ECAC CONFERENCE overall standings
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12 wins … 3 losses … 3 ties ………… # 7 – UNION COLLEGE
13 wins … 3 losses … 3 ties ………… # 8 – QUINNIPIAC
12 wins … 3 losses … 1 ties ………… # 9 – CLARKSON

7 wins … 4 losses … 2 ties ………… # 13 – CORNELL
6 wins … 3 losses … 3 ties ………… # 24 – YALE
8 wins … 6 losses … 4 ties ………… # 27 – R.P.I.
8 wins … 9 losses … 2 ties ………… # 30 – ST. LAWRENCE
7 wins … 9 losses … 2 ties ………… # 31 – COLGATE
5 wins … 6 losses … 1 ties ………… # 33 – BROWN
4 wins … 7 losses … 2 ties ………… # 40 – HARVARD

3 wins … 12 losses … 0 ties ………. # 52 – PRINCETON
2 wins … 10 losses … 0 ties ………. # 53 – DARTMOUTH

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Clarkson University Canadian legionnaire BEN SEXTON (14), the 22-year-old senior center who was tabbed in the seventh round (# 206 overall) of the 2009 NHL Draft by the Boston Bruins, and the Golden Knights are ranked # 9 in the nation by both the USCHO.com and USA Today/USA Hockey polls at the moment but will soon have their mettle sincerely tested by facing off against a pair of formidable Hockey East conference opponents, (# 10) UMass-Lowell and host Vermont, at the upcoming Catamount Cup in Burlington.
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Half of the twelve ECAC Conference squads will be back in action the first weekend after Christmas.

Ivy Leaguers Cornell and Princeton are both migrating south to participate in the 14th annual FLORIDA HOCKEY CLASSIC, a tournament which is always held in in the little southwestern town of Estero (total population of roughly 18,000 people) at the Germain Arena (official capacity for 7,082 spectators), the regular rink of the East Coast Hockey League’s Florida Everblades. Another Ivy League institution, Dartmouth College, will be hosting its traditional LEDYARD NATIONAL BANK CLASSIC holiday gathering which will include the United States Air Force Academy, Northeastern University as well as Providence College. Finally, as far as the Ivys are concerned, the defending NCAA national champions from Yale will host visiting Holy Cross in a non-conference affair.

Quinnipiac University will be taking part in the almost all-Connecticut tournament otherwise known as the UCONN HOCKEY CLASSIC while Clarkson University from northern upstate New York is making the trip east into Vermont and will skate at the 17th installment of the CATAMOUNT CUP.

Dec 28 … Estero, FL …………. Princeton vs Maine
Dec 28 … Estero, FL …………. Cornell vs New Hampshire
Dec 28 … Burlington, VT …….. Clarkson vs Vermont

Dec 29 … New Haven, CT …… Yale vs Holy Cross
Dec 29 … Storrs, CT …………. Quinnipiac vs Massachusetts
Dec 29 … Burlington, VT …….. Clarkson vs UMass-Lowell
Dec 29 … Hanover, NH ………. Dartmouth vs Providence
Dec 29 … Estero, FL …………. Princeton vs unknown
Dec 29 … Estero, FL …………. Cornell vs unknown

Dec 30 … Storrs, CT ………….. Quinnipiac vs unknown
Dec 30 … Hanover, NH ……….. Dartmouth vs unknown

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St. Lawrence University prolific Canadian legionnaire GREG CAREY (10), the undrafted, 23-year-old senior from Hamilton, Ontario, who topped the Saints with both 28 goals and 51 points from 38 NCAA games last term, is currently leading all players skating for the various 59 Division I men’s ice hockey teams this season with both 38 points as well as an average of 1.89 points per game.
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E.C.A.C. CONFERENCE scoring leaders
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36 pts … 13 go … 23 as … 19 ga …… Greg CAREY, St. Lawrence
26 pts … 18 go ….. 8 as … 17 ga …… Ryan HAGGERTY, R.P.I.
25 pts … 13 go … 12 as … 19 ga …… Sam ANAS, Quinnipiac
24 pts … 13 go … 11 as … 19 ga …… Matt CAREY, St. Lawrence
23 pts ….. 9 go … 14 as … 19 ga …… Kellen JONES, Quinnipiac
22 pts ….. 9 go … 13 as … 16 ga …… Daniel CARR, Union College
21 pts ….. 6 go … 15 as … 19 ga …… Connor JONES, Quinnipiac
20 pts … 12 go ….. 8 as … 18 ga …… Brock HIGGS, R.P.I.
19 pts ….. 2 go … 17 as … 18 ga …… Mat BODIE, Union College
19 pts ….. 9 go … 10 as … 19 ga …… Jeremy WICK, St. Lawrence
18 pts ….. 7 go … 11 as … 18 ga …… Matt NEAL, R.P.I.
18 pts ….. 5 go … 13 as … 19 ga …… Justin BAKER, St. Lawrence
17 pts ….. 2 go … 15 as … 15 ga …… Kevin SULLIVAN, Union College
17 pts ….. 4 go … 13 as … 17 ga …… Jacob LALIBERTE, R.P.I.
17 pts ….. 6 go … 11 as … 18 ga …… Mike BORKOWSKI, Colgate

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Harvard University Canadian legionnaire RAPHAEL GIRARD (30), the undrafted, 22-year-old senior goaltender from St. Hyacinthe, Quebec, who has been sharing the playing time with sophomore teammate Steve Michalek, the sixth round (# 161 overall) pick of the Minnesota Wild at the 2011 NHL Draft, for Crimson coach Ted Donato this season, currently leads all netminders in all of Division I who have appeared in a minimum of one-third of their team’s NCAA games this term with a sparkling .948 save percentage.
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E.C.A.C. CONFERENCE goaltending leaders
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1.72 avg … .932 svpct ….. 6 ga …… Steve PERRY, Clarkson
1.88 avg … .942 svpct ….. 8 ga …… Raphael GIRARD, Harvard
1.88 avg … .906 svpct … 19 ga …… Michael GARTEIG, Quinnipiac
2.17 avg … .922 svpct … 17 ga …… Scott DIEBOLD, R.P.I.
2.31 avg … .905 svpct … 13 ga …… Colin STEVENS, Union College
2.39 avg … .909 svpct … 12 ga …… Andy ILES, Cornell
2.44 avg … .912 svpct ….. 9 ga …… Alex LYON, Yale
2.52 avg … .895 svpct … 11 ga …… Greg LEWIS, Clarkson
2.54 avg … .910 svpct ….. 9 ga …… Eric MIHALIK, Colgate
2.62 avg … .901 svpct ….. 6 ga …… Tyler STEEL, Brown
2.72 avg … .925 svpct ….. 6 ga …… Marco DE FILIPPO, Brown
2.79 avg … .886 svpct ….. 7 ga …… A. SAKELLAROPOULOS, Union College

One player deserving of honorable mention is Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute goaltender SCOTT DIEBOLD, the homegrown junior from Buffalo, New York, who has done yeoman’s work since being pressed into action after an early, season-ending injury to the Engineers’ projected starter. Canadian legionnaire JASON KASDORF, the sophomore from Winnipeg, Manitoba, who was the sixth round selection of the Winnipeg Jets (# 157 overall) at the 2011 NHL Draft and had put up excellent numbers (1.62 avg, .935 svpct) for R.P.I. in 23 games as a freshman last term, but was put out of action with a serious shoulder injury after only two games this fall. It should be remembered that Diebold, who made just seven appearances (3.22 avg, .873 svpct) as a sophomore during the 2012/13 campaign, had made a total of just 17 career NCAA appearances (3.22 avg, .889 svpct) for the Engineers coming into this current season.

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Cornell right wing BRIAN FERLIN (17), the junior from Jacksonville, Florida, who was the fourth round choice (# 121 overall) of the Boston Bruins at the 2011 NHL Draft and currently leads the Big Red with seven goals in a baker’s dozen NCAA games this season, has a chance on the backhand against Yale goaltender ALEX LYON (34), the 21-year-old freshman from Baudette, Minnesota, who has established himself as the first choice between the pipes for the defending national champions this term, during the ECAC Conference / Ivy League tilt at the James Lynah Rink in Ithaca, New York.

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Harvard Hold Yale In 238th Game


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The Crimson’s Canadian legionnaire RAPHAEL GIRARD (30), the undrafted senior goaltender from St. Hyacinthe, Quebec, who was destined to make an eye-opening 52 saves in this particular contest, keeps close watch on Bulldogs left wing MICHAEL DOHERTY (24), the productive freshman from Reading, Massachusetts, who has already notched three goals and nine points in his first twelve NCAA contests, during the 238th all-time meeting between legendary arch-rivals Harvard University and Yale University.
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The Crimson senior netminder making his final appearance in front of a sellout crowd on the home ice of his school’s ultimate adversary did all he could to engineer an enormous upset on the date of a most historic anniversary in American history but an overwhelming assualt in the final period by the defending NCAA national champions ensured that the 238th all-time meeting between traditional arch-rivals HARVARD and YALE would only produce a hard-fought 2-2 draw to be recorded in the ECAC Conference standings.

Harvard University are capably led by tenth-year head coach TED DONATO, the former Crimson player who was voted the Tournament Most Valuable Player when Harvard won the NCAA national championship in 1989 and later went on the skate for the United States at the 1992 Winter Olympic Games as well as in 796 National Hockey League games (150 go, 347 pts), mostly for the Boston Bruins, over the course of a thirteen-year professional career. The Crimson are currently rebuilding, as evidenced by the loss of three of Harvard’s four top goal-scorers from last season, and have gotten off to a bit of a slow start with only four wins from their first dozen matches to begin this term, as well. Neverthless, on the 72nd anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Donato was hoping to lead his troops into New Haven and produce an upsetting result in the belly of the unique Yale Whale.

And, after nearly thirty minutes of scoreless hockey, it was Harvard, in fact, who even managed to strike twice and take a 2-0 lead into the second intermission at the David S. Ingalls Rink. Canadian legionnaire ALEX KERFOOT, the promising 19-year-old freshman from West Vancouver, British Columbia, who was fifth round pick (# 150 overall) at the 2012 NHL Draft by the New Jersey Devils, broke the deadlock with a power play goal almost nine minutes into the middle frame and then LUKE ESPOSITO, the freshman center from Greenwich, Connecticut, who is the nephew of former NHL star and multiple Stanley Cup winner Mark Messier, doubled the advantage with a second goal for Harvard only 13 seconds before the end of the second period. Influential Crimson defenseman PATRICK MCNALLY, the junior from Glen Head, New York, was the fourth round choice (# 115 overall) of the Vancouver Canucks at the 2010 NHL Draft, collected assists on both goals.

Underwriting this success for the visitors was the sensational form of Harvard senior goaltender RAPHAEL GIRARD, who stopped all 31 shots he faced through the first forty minutes of play.

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Yale left wing TRENT RUFFOLO (11), the seasoned junor from Coral Gables, Florida, and Harvard right wing KRIS CRISCUOLO(33), the emerging sophomore from Southampton, New Jersey, who has scored seven goals in his first thirteen varsity games for the Crimson, during the 238th all-time ice hockey contest between traditional foes played for a sellout crowd of 3,500 spectators at the sold out David S. Ingalls Rink in New Haven.
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Yale, who seriously lag behind in the all-time series record between the two schools (77 wins against 141 losses with 20 ties) but can now accurately state that they have won just as many NCAA national championship titles in history as Harvard has, were not about to fall on home ice to their eternal enemy, however. And so the Bulldogs came out for the final frame and began to lay an absolute siege upon the Harvard cage, one that would ultimately see Yale outshoot the Crimson by the astonishing margin of 20-4 over the last twenty minutes of regulation play. Indeed, it took the home side barely more than two minutes to haul one of the goals back and manufacture some genuine belief when defenseman MATT KILLIAN, the versatile junior from Basking Ridge, New Jersey, who actually appeared in all four of the Bulldogs’ memorable NCAA tournament games last spring as a right wing for the very first time in his collegiate career, crashed the net and won a battle for a rebound before slipping the puck through the pads of the beleaguered Harvard shot-stopper Girard to count his first goal of this season (and only the second strike in 60 career games for the Yale varsity).

The relentless Bulldogs finally broke through for an deserved equalizer with less than six minutes reminaing when senior KENNY AGOSTINO, an All-ECAC Second Team selection last season who had his NHL rights traded from the Pittsburgh Penquins to the Calgary Flames as part of the deal that brought NHL veteran star and two-time Canadian Olympic gold medalist Jarome Iginla to the Steel City, made a deceptive move in the right faceoff circle by indicating with a head fake as if he was contemplating a pass but, instead, unleashed a low shot into the corner of the Crimson net to score his third goal of this term.

MATT BEATTIE, the sophomore left wing from Whitehouse Station, New Jersey, who was the seventh round choice (# 207 overall) of the Vancouver Canucks at the 2012 NHL Draft but went pointless in 15 NCAA games as a freshman for Yale last season, set up both goals for the home side in the third period against their eternal enemy Harvard and collected the first two assists of his collegiate career in the process.

With absolutely nothing between these two Ivy League schools settled, as last as far as this current season goes and only one regular-scheduled conference game left on the scheudule, Harvard (now 4-7-2) and Yale (now 6-3-3) will meet again later this season in an event being billed as “THE RIVALRY ON ICE” on January 11th at the famed Madison Square Garden in New York City.

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Yale right wing KENNY AGOSTINO (18), the senior from Flanders, New Jersey, who was selected in the fifth round (# 140 overall) of the 2010 National Hockey League Draft by the Pittsburgh Penguins and finished as the Bulldogs’ joint top scorer with 41 points in 37 NCAA games last season, netted the first goal in what will, without question, forever rank as one of the Ivy League school’s most famous victories ever — Yale’s 3-2 overtime defeat of traditional powerhouse Minnesota at the Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids, Michigan, in the first round of the 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament last spring.
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December 7, 2013
David S. Ingalls Rink – New Haven, Connecticut
Attendance : 3,500

YALE 2 – HARVARD 2

28:48 … HRV – Kerfoot (Vesey, McNally) – ppg
39:47 … HRV – Esposito (McNally, Everson)
42:08 … YALE – Killian (Beattie)
54:19 … YALE – Agostino (Beattie, O’Gara)

shots-on-goal : Yale 54 ( 16 + 15 + 20 + 3 ) – Harvard 27 ( 9 + 10 + 4 + 4 )

penalty minutes : Harvard 10 – Yale 8

YALE : Lyon – Young, O’Gara ; Fallen, Obuchowski ; Witek, Killian – Doherty, Wilson, Agostino ; Ruffolo, Cooper, Weberg ; Beattie, Orzetti, Learned ; DiChiara, Izmirlian, Hayden

HARVARD : Girard – Everson, McNally ; Ford, Fick ; Guiltnan, Bergin – Vesey, Malone, Hart ; O’Reagan, Kerfoot, Criscuolo ; Tringale, Esposito, Moy ; Zielonka, McGregor, Jaw

NOTE — Yale were without injured center JESSE ROOT, the senior from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who was the fourth-leading scorer with both 12 goals and 33 points in 34 games for the national champions last season. It was Root who scored in three of Yale’s four games at the annual NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament last spring, including the final tally in the Bulldogs’ 4-0 triumph over New Haven intra-city rival Quinnipiac University in the 2013 Final (which just so happened to be held in Pittsburgh, to review). Root had already netted six goals this season — a figure which is still twice as many as the nearest Yale player — before being sidelined recently.

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Harvard University center ALEX KERFOOT (14), the freshman Canadian import who scored the first goal of this particular contest, watches as his countryman, Crimson senior goaltender RAPHAEL GIRARD (30), stops Yale University center CHRIS IZMIRLIAN (25), the freshman originally from Highland Beach in Florida who has scored three goals in his first eleven collegiate contests, during the 238th all-time meeting on ice between the two Ivy League rivals at the David S. Ingalls Rink in New Haven.

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Harvard & Yale Will Skate For 238th Time Tonight


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Yale University captain ANDREW MILLER (17), the undrafted senior from Bloomfied Hills, Michigan, who now skates professionally for the Oklahoma City Barons in the American Hockey League, is pursued by Harvard University skipper DANNY BIEGA (9), the imported senior Canadian defenseman who was chosen by the Carolina Hurricanes in the third round (# 67 overall) of the 2010 National Hockey League Draft and currently competes for the Charlotte Checkers in the American Hockey League, during the 237th all-time meeting between the two legendary Ivy League arch-rivals early last January in a ECAC Conference clash at the unique David S. Ingalls Rink (a.k.a. “The Yale Whale”) in New Haven, Connecticut.
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The two storied Ivy League schools, who first met on ice more than 113 years ago at the old St. Nicholas Rink on the island of Manhattan in New York, will renew their intense rivalry for the 238th time in collegiate ice hockey history. Of course, it is YALE UNIVERSITY who are the defending NCAA national champions. But, as many people are well aware, it is HARVARD UNIVERSITY, who won their one and only NCAA national title more than two decades ago in 1989, that holds a commanding lead in the all-time series by sporting the dominant record of 141 wins against 77 losses with 19 draws.

It is a fact that, recently, the Bulldogs have done much better against their traditional arch-adversary, the Crimson, in the past five years than at any other prolonged stretch since the 1940s. Yale has won seven of the past games against Harvard, including the two Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference matches last season at the Alexander C. Bright Hockey Center (5-1) in November of 2012 as well as at the David S. Ingalls Rink (4-0) in January of 2013. This surge of Bulldog power in the Harvard series, unseen since the days when former New York Rangers ironman forward MURRAY MURDOCH was only just beginning his 27-year run behind the Yale bench, has, for the most part, coincided with the arrival of current head coach KEITH ALLAIN, who was, himself, a goaltender at Yale University in the late 1970s.

In a concentrated effort to reconnect with the glorious history and tradition of this particular college hockey rivalry, both Harvard and Yale have signed a multi-year agreement with a marketing and promotion firm, Leverage Agency, to bring the series back to the bright lights of New York City … this coming January, the Bulldogs and the Crimson will face-off at the famed Madison Square Garden arena on Broadway for the first time since February of 1926 in an event that is being touted as “THE RIVALRY ON ICE.” Not surprisingly, the fast-approaching 239th Harvard vs Yale game will be broadcast nationally on the NBC Sports Network.

Tonight, this on the anniversary of Pearl Harbor, an underdog Harvard squad (4-7-1 overall) will look to invade New Haven and drop the upset bombshell on the reigning emperors of all college ice hockey, who are currently ranked # 8 by USCHO.com and fashion a record of six wins against three losses with two ties so far this season.

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Yale senior winger ANTOINE LAGANIERE (28), the undrafted Canadian import from Quebec who finished as the Bulldogs’ third-leading scorer last season with both 15 goals and 29 points in 37 NCAA games and now skates professionally in the American Hockey League for the Norfolk Admirals, and Harvard’s Swedish winger ALEXANDER FALLSTROM, the Crimson’s leading scorer last term (31 ga, 9 go, 21 pts) who was selected by the Minnesota Wild in the fourth round (# 116 overall) of the 2009 NHL Draft but now turns out for a living in the AHL on behalf of the Providence Bruins, collide during the ECAC Conference meeting last January at the Yale Whale in New Haven.

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Yale Clips # 1 Quinnipiac, Celebrates National Championship Crown


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Yale winger TRENT RUFFOLO (11), the sophomore from Coral Springs, Florida, who has netted ten goals in two seasons since arriving in New Haven, and Quinnipiac’s Canadian legionnaire MATTHEW PECA (20), the sophomore winger from Petawawa, Ontario, who was the seventh round selection (# 201 overall) of the Tampa Bay Lightning at the 2011 National Hockey League Draft, compete for the puck along the boards during the so-called “Battle of Whitney Avenue” that served as the Final of the 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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A late second period goal that appeared to materialize out of seemingly nowhere and a surprising follow up strike off of a rebound from a very sharp angle tilted the contest in favor of the underdog Ivy Leaguers once and for all as # 15 YALE UNIVERSITY completely shut down top ranked QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY 4-0 to win the coveted NCAA national championship title for the very first time ever in school history.

# 1 Quinnipiac had already defeated its intra-city foe from Connecticut three times previously during this 2012/13 campaign, including a 3-0 triumph in the third place consolation game of the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference playoff tournament at Atlantic City, New Jersey in late March. To review, that last loss to the Bobcats had looked as if it could very well cost the Bulldogs an invitation to the annual Sweet Sixteen On Ice. And it would have, too, had Michigan been able to conquer Notre Dame in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association tournament finale.

However, resugent Yale truly found its form once the NCAA tournament began and certainly earned the right to play in the Final of the 2013 Frozen Four after knocking off two of the nation’s three highest ranked teams. Extra time had been required in the NCAA opener against # 2 Minnesota as well as in the Frozen Four semifinal opposite the # 3 University of Massachusetts – Lowell side. In their other NCAA tournament contest this spring, the Bulldogs trailed for two periods against # 7 North Dakota before rallying to score unanswered four goals in final twenty minutes.

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Yale’s Canadian legionnaire goaltender JEFF MALCOLM (33), the undrafted senior from Lethbridge, Alberta, who posted career numbers (30 ga, 2.24 avg, .919 save pct) his final season in New Haven, tracks the puck after halting Quinnipiac’s leading goal-scorer JORDAN SAMUELS-THOMAS (19), the homegrown junior right wing from West Hartford who was the seventh round pick (# 203 overall) of the Atlanta Thrashers at the 2009 NHL Draft and redshirted last season after transferring from Bowling Green State University.
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The 2013 NCAA Final, an all-Connecticut clash watched by an audience of 18,184 spectators at the Consol Engery Center in Pittsburgh, had all the makings of a classic goaltenders’ duel with the second intermission literally only seconds away.

But then Quinnipiac shot-stopper ERIC HARTZELL, the senior from White Bear Lake, Minnesota, who was selected at the First Team (East) All-America goaltender for this 2012/13 season, went behind his own net and attempted to play the puck around the boards on the backhand. Pinching in near the left point, though, was Yale defenseman GUS YOUNG, the junior from Deadham, Massachusetts, who was chosen by the Colorado Avalanche in the seventh round (# 184 overall) of the 2009 National Hockey League Draft. Hartzell had plenty of time to get back in position, but unsung Bulldogs center CLINTON BOURBONAIS, parked in the left faceoff circle, was able to redirect the low shot from Young ever so slightly and register what has to be the biggest goal in the entire history of Yale ice hockey.

The homegrown junior from Colcehster had notched only three goals in 35 games this term for the Yale varsity coming into the 2013 NCAA Final; then again, all throughout this 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament, Yale benefited by important goals coming from the most unlikeliest sources.

The energized Bulldogs doubled their advantage roughly three and a half minutes into the final frame after Bourbonais, a biomedical engineering major who has totaled 27 assists combined the past two seasons for Yale, sent CHARLES ORZETTI into zone down the left wing. A long, routine shot was easily turned aside by the standout Quinnipiac netminder but the hustling freshman from Wyckoff, New Jersey, tracked down the rebound and squeezed the puck through the five hole of the Hartzell from a very sharp angle. Just the second goal of the season, then, for Orzetti, who only skated 19 games for the Bulldogs this term (but did appear in all of Yale’s last eleven contests).

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Yale captain ANDREW MILLER (17), the senior right wing from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, who led the Bulldogs with 18 goals and was also joint top scorer with 41 points this term, beats unfortunate Quinnipiac netminder ERIC HARTZELL, the undrafted standout (42 ga, 1.57 avg, .933 save pct) who later signed a free agent contract with the Pittsburgh Penguins, through the five hole on the breakaway at the Consol Energy Center.
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Fittingly enough, it was Yale captain ANDREW MILLER, the very same man who had lifted the Bulldogs over # 2 UMass – Lowell at the semifinal hurde by scoring a vital goal in overtime, who effectively broke the back of Quinnipiac after taking a smooth pass from left wing KENNY AGOSTINO, the junior left wing from Flanders, New Jersey, who was tabbed by the Pittsburgh Penguins in the fifth round (# 140 overall) of the 2010 NHL Draft and paced Yale with 24 assists this season.

Miller, who finished with two goals and five points in four games for Yale at this year’s NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament, would be honored as the Most Outstanding Player.

In a tactical move that was grounded in far more reality as compared to desperation, Quinnipiac removed its goaltender in favor of an extra attacker with well over seven minutes to skate in the third period but it was not long before Yale center JESSE ROOT was able to find the back of the empty net.

Yale senior netminder JEFF MALCOLM became only the fifth goaltender to post a shutout in the championship final over the long, 65-year history of the NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament. Denver University (1968 and 2004), Boston University (1972) and Boston College (2010) are the only other schools in history to have kept the scoresheet clean in the NCAA championship game. The triumphant Bulldogs, meanwhile, became just the third Ivy League instution of higher learning after Cornell (1967 and 1970) and Harvard (1989) to ever celebrate the coveted NCAA national title.

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Yale center JESSE ROOT (20), the undrafted junior center from Pittsburgh who scored three goals in the Bulldogs’ last four games of this 2012/13 season, lines up a wrist shot that Quinnipiac defenseman DANNY FEDERICO (22), the undrafted sophomore from Acton, Massachusetts, seeks to block during the all-New Haven Final of the 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament at the Consol Energy Center in the western Pennsylvania city where the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio rivers all meet.
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2013 NCAA Men’s Ice Hockey Tournament Final
Consol Energy Center – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
YALE UNIVERSITY 4 – QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY 0

39:59 … YALE – Bourbonais 4 (Young)
43:35 … YALE – Orzetti 2 (Bourbonais, Laganiere)
49:06 … YALE – Miller 18 (Agostino)
53:02 … YALE – Root 12 (Miller, O’Gara) – eng

QUINNIPIAC : Hartzell – Davies, Tolkinen ; Federico, Dalhuisen ; Barron, Currie – Peca, K. Jones, C. Jones ; Harvey, Langlois, St. Denis ; van Brabant, Arnt, Samuels-Thomas ; Bui, Hibbeler, Goodman

YALE : Malcolm – Young, O’Gara ; Fallen, Obuchowski ; Dueck, Witek – Agostino, Root, Miller ; Orzetti, Bourbonais, Laganiere ; Balch, Wilson, Day ; Ruffolo, Cooper, Killian

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The Yale Whale


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It is there, at the corner of Prospect and Sachem Streets in the almost four centuries old New England city of New Haven, Connecticut, that stands what is easily the most single most amazing ice hockey arena not just in all the United States of America but, indeed, the entire world, itself.

To this very day, architects across the globe still marvel at as well as seriously study the spectacular DAVID S. INGALLS RINK, which is, technically speaking, not actually on the campus of YALE UNIVERSITY, itself, but neither a building that exactly blends in with the rows of three-story houses in the working-class neighborhood it neighbors, either.

For more than half a century old now, the very distinct YALE WHALE, as the unique hockey arena is widely known in common parlance, has faithfully served as the home ice of every consensus First Team (East) All-America and / or future National Hockey League skater that the long and storied Yale Bulldogs varsity has ever boasted.

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Not long after the Yale varsity brought the third place trophy won at the 1952 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament in Colorado Springs all the way back to New Haven, it was decided that the Ivy League school required a proper rink of its own if the Bulldogs could be fairly expected to compete year in and year out with the skaters of traditional arch-enemy to the north in Massachusetts, Harvard University. And so a very talented graduate of the Yale School of Architecture (Class of 1934) was recruited by JUAN TRIPPE, the innovative Chairman of the Board of Directors for Pan American World Airways who also just so happened to be a Yale alum, to design a brand new facility for a Bulldogs team then trained by MURRAY MURDOCH, the former New York Rangers left wing who had set the National Hockey League record for consecutive games played. Once Yale University president A. WHITNEY GRISWOLD had approved the architect’s plans as well as overcome the fierce opposition put forth by some of the alumni and faculty, construction on the ambitious project began in 1956.

The “exciting and prolific” EERO SAARINEN had been born in Finland but moved to the United States with his family at an early age and grew up in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, the very same place which would, one day, also serve as the hometown of one ANDREW MILLER, the captain of the 2012/13 Yale University ice hockey team. Back in in 1953, no less of a publication than The New York Times had already described Saarinen as “the most widely known and respected architect of his generation.” Indeed, Saarinen had already designed the would-be iconic Gateway Arch in St. Louis (which was not actually built until the early 1960s) and, among other things, would also be responsible for the “ultramodern, wavelike” TWA Terminal at Kennedy International Airport in New York City, the Dulles International Airport near Washington, D.C., as well as the CBS corporate headquarters building in downtown Manhattan.

The distinguishing architectural characteristic of the Yale Whale is Saarinen’s arched roof, which has a maximum height of 23 meters and is considered to be a hallmark of the classic Modernist style. The reinforced concrete which serves as the novel ice arena’s humpback spine is 90 meters long. An innovative system of cables attached to the arch supports the timber frame inside the rink while another set of exterior cables, conceived by project engineer FRED N. SEVERUD, connect the arch to the outer edges of the aluminum roof in order to address forces caused by asymmetrical wind loads.

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The final tab for the Yale Whale came to $ 1.5 million dollars (which turned out to be twice as much as the original cost estimate) with the lion’s share of the financing for the new ice rink in New Haven being generously provided by the prominent Ingalls family.

DAVID S. INGALLS, SR., had enrolled as a freshman at Yale University in the fall of 1916 but was inducted into the United States Navy as an aviator by the very next spring. The native of Cleveland, Ohio, found himself in France by the fall of 1917 and eventually would earn the Navy Distinguished Service Medal for his efforts during First World War. Ingalls shot down six German planes, a total which made the Bulldogs frosh the one and only U.S. Navy fighter pilot to attain the coveted “ace” status.

Ingalls returned to Yale just in time to captain the Bulldogs varsity for the two February games in Brooklyn (the loss to Harvard and the victory over Princeton) that comprised the entire 1918/19 ice hockey schedule. The decorated World War I hero also skippered Yale again when the Bulldogs compiled a record of four wins against five losses during the 1919/20 campaign. It is interesting to note that Yale University’s outdoor rink was unplayable in February of 1920 and so the Bulldogs contested all three of its home games in Philadelphia.

By the early 1950s, after again serving as an officer in the U.S. Navy during the Second World War, Ingalls had become a member of the Board of Directors for Pan American World Airways but probably had not forgotten that he, himself, had never actually skated a home game for Yale University ice hockey team in the city of New Haven, itself.

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It was not even until the long since gone New Haven Arena appeared in 1926 that the Yale varsity began to stage all of its “home” games at the same physical location with any consistency. An indoor hockey of the very same name had been originally been constructed on Grove Street in 1916 but had never really been embraced by the Bulldogs before burning down eight years later. A replacement rink was quickly re-built, however, primarily in order to house the fledgling New Haven Eagles of the new Canadian-American Hockey League.

No fewer than five of the original New Haven Eagles had spent the previous 1925/26 season skating for the Boston Bruins in the elite National Hockey League. One of those players, the Canadian forward NORM SHAY, later settled in neighboring Hamden, Connecticut, and would become a linesman in both the Can-Am circuit and its successor, the American Hockey League. Shay’s son, Ted, later became a prominent player for the Yale University squad that finished in third place at the 1952 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament.

The blue-shirted Bulldogs were still sharing the New Haven Arena downtown with the minor league professionals when one DAVID S. INGALLS, JR., arrived on the Yale University campus and was chosen as the captain of the freshman team for the 1952/53 season.

Dave Ingalls, like his father had before him, also became the skipper of the Yale varsity in his senior season. It was, indeed, the captain Ingalls who made a fine pass from behind the net to provide linemate JOHN AKERS with the chance to score the only goal of the game early in the second period when the Bulldogs defeated fierce rival Harvard by the minimum scoreline on March 3, 1956. This historic result would prove to be the very last time that Yale ever did beat the hated Crimson at the old New Haven Arena.

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Saarinen’s masterpiece, which was christened the DAVID S. INGALLS RINK to honor the father and son who had both captained the Bulldogs varsity, was completed in time to begin the 1958/59 campaign. Although Yale featured would be First Team (East) All-America GERRY JONES between the pipes and went on to finish that season with a respectable record of 12 wins against nine losses with one tie, the inauguration contest against Northeastern University on December 3, 1958, was not a triumphant occasion. A meager crowd of only nine hundred spectators (it was a midweek match, for the record) showed up at the newly-opened Yale Whale (which has always maintained the official capacity to hold 3,486 fans) to watch the visitors from Boston vanquish the Bulldogs 4-3.

As for the very first ever Harvard – Yale confrontation at the corner of Prospect and Sachem Streets in New Haven, at least the Bulldogs did not bow to the despised Crimson as the two teams skated to a 5-5 draw on March 7, 1959, in what was the last game of the season for both sides. Yale defenseman CHARLES SMITH had scored two quick goals to give the the hosts a 2-0 advantage after only 48 seconds but the Bulldogs would still require a second goal of the game from two-time All-Ivy League selection ED MCGONAGLE with twenty seconds remaining in order to claim a share of the spoils. Much to the chagrin of the Yale supporters, it would not be until February of 1966 (the season following the retirement of the long-time bench master Murdoch) that the Bulldogs were finally able to register a victory over its great arch-rival on the ice surface at the David S. Ingalls Rink.

It was in the 40th year of play at the legendary ice arena in New Haven that the Bulldogs varsity was, at last, able to secure an Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference regular season championship banner to hang in the Yale Whale’s faithful belly and, despite being knocked out of the 1997/98 ECAC playoffs by the eternal enemy Harvard, Yale did earn an invitation to the annual NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament for the first time in almost half a century.

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Mom’s Hockey Team Wins NCAA Title


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1966-67 YALE UNIVERSITY varsity were led by JACK MORRISON (wearing # 4 jersey, sitting fourth from right in the front row), the talented senior forward from Minneapolis, Minnesota, who reset the school records previously established by Wally Kilrea after totaling 68 assists and 119 points in three seasons skating for the Bulldogs. Morrison, who scored the overtime goal for Yale that handed 1967 NCAA champion Cornell University its only loss of the season, was selected First Team (East) All-America and went on to appear with the United States at the 1968 Winter Olympic Games in Grenoble, France. In the photo above, the sophomore goaltender sitting at the far left in the first row is MARK DAYTON, another Minneapolis native who is the 40th and current Governor of the state of Minnesota.
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The world-famous “YALE WHALE”, itself, is actually not all that far of a drive away from the corner of Whitney and Canner streets in the very distinct city of New Haven, Connecticut. Of course, the varsity ice hockey team of well-known YALE UNIVERSITY had been contesting its home games in the truly unique athletic arena well before this blog’s mother took her newly-earned doctorate degree in art history from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and went off to work at the Ivy League institution in the late 1980s or, in fact, even before the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference, itself, had even been created more than half a century ago nowadays. Never a tremendous supporter of a sport she, herself, once sincerely described as “barbaric and brutal by nature”, the recent arrival in New Haven wasted no time at all promoting the novel David S. Ingalls Ice Rink, nonetheless.

As it stood, the younger of two sons both then away attending college in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts was keen on the fast-paced stuff that the Canadians have always loved so much, and so off in the mail went one of those little pocket calendar schedules — featuring the one and only Yale Whale on the cover — for the 1987/88 edition of the Yale Bulldogs ice hockey squad.

Oddly enough, this particular blogger was by this time a regular reader of The Boston Globe and eagerly anticipating a 1988 Winter Olympic Games event that would see a trio of Harvard University players skating for the United States contingent at the Calgary Saddledome in western Canada. On the other hand, the blog was also very familiar with former Yale University First Team (East) All-America center BOB BROOKE and contemporary Bulldogs head coach TIM TAYLOR, both of whom had been involved with the ill-fated United States squad that participated at the XIV Winter Olympic Games in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia. Only just a few short years earlier, it had been the pioneering Brooke who had become the very first player from Yale University to ever appear in a National Hockey League contest after joining the New York Rangers in March of 1984.

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Yale University’s 1983 NCAA First Team (East) All-America center BOB BROOKE (13) congratulates right wing ED OLCZYK (12), the 17-year-old teenager from Palos Heights, Illinois, whom the in-state Chicago Black Hawks would make the third overall pick in the first round of the annual National Hockey League Draft in the summer of 1984, after Olczyk’s goal for the United States national team against the Washington Captials of the National Hockey League in an exhibition contest early on in the 1983/84 season, well ahead of the XIV Winter Olympic Games to be held in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia.
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The New York-born, Pennsylvania-raised blogger being schooled in Massachusetts was also acutely aware of the progress of one RANDY WOOD, the former Yale University left winger who was in the process of scoring 22 goals during the 1987/88 campaign as an NHL rookie in his first full season with the New York Islanders. The native of Princeton, New Jersey, had been promoted from the Springfield Indians of the American Hockey League at the tail end of the previous season and gone on to skate in 13 of the Islanders’ 14 Stanley Cup playoff contests that spring. Indeed, Wood had been in the thick of things when the New York Islanders rallied from a 3-1 playoff series deficit to defeat the Washington Capitals in a memorable seventh game that required no less than 68 minutes and 47 seconds of overtime play before Islanders center PAT LAFONTAINE finally beat 1984 United States Olympic team colleague BOB MASON with a long shot, spin-around slapshot from the blue line.

(The actual owner of this blog and the meat-and-potatoes producer of the all articles seen here can both joyfully recall this legendary Stanley Cup contest as well as the coinciding Keg Redistribution Program that was conducted at tiny Williams College in western Massachusetts on that memorable night, but, alas, that would be another story for some other time)

One major obstacle standing in the way increased attention to the Yale Bulldogs was a long-standing loyalty to the University of Minnesota’s ice hockey program. It had been in Phoenix, Arizona, in the mid-1950s that Mom’s parents had put her on a train bound for Wellesley College in eastern Massachusetts and bascially said, “We really don’t have any money to get you back so good luck with everything!” But well before the two guys responsible for this particular blog had even been born, the influential couple who had never attended college, themselves, moved to the state of Minnesota where they happily lived out the rest of their days in the Land of 10,000 Lakes.

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When center BOB KUDELSKI left Yale University at the conclusion of the 1986/87 season, only the legendary DING PALMER (87 goals) had put more pucks in the back of the net than the seventy-eight that the New England native who was chosen by the Los Angeles Kings in the National Hockey League’s so-called Supplemental Draft of 1986 had in only three seasons skating in the Eastern Collegiate Atheltic Conference on behalf of the Bulldogs.
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Truth be told, Mom had much more luck promoting hockey in the New England city that was originally founded in 1638 and is located on the northern shore of the Long Island Sound when shifting the focus to the old New Haven Nighthawks then competing in the American Hockey League. The professional Nighthawks had been around since the early 1970s and had already served as the AHL farm club of both the New York Islanders and New York Rangers as well as the Minnesota North Stars (the traditional favorite NHL club of this particular blogger). By the late 1980s, the New Haven Nighthawks had been the AHL affiliate of the Los Angeles Kings for almost a decade.

On prominent player on the New Haven Nighthawks roster in the midst of his rookie professional season during the 1987/88 season was former Yale University center BOB KUDELSKI, the native of Springfield, Massachusetts, who concluded his college career as the Bulldogs all-time leading scorer with 158 points (breaking the school record of 155 set by Bob Brooke in 1983). After trying out and failing to land a spot on the 1988 United States Olympic team, the 1987 All-ECAC First Team selection earned a place on the roster of the Los Angeles Kings in training camp and skated in 26 NHL games at the start of the 87/88 campaign. But Kudelski was soon demoted to New Haven of the AHL that year, where the popular Yale product scored 47 goals in 110 AHL games over the course of two seasons for the Nighthawks before landing a regular place on the Kings’ NHL roster to begin the 1989/90 schedule.

And so, to continue with the confessions, it was always at the old Memorial Coliseum downtown where this particular blogger preferred to patronize local ice hockey in the city of New Haven. The unfortunate Yale Whale was actually a victim of many drive-bys in the past but never, regrettably, has never been a place where this particular blogger could be found in attendance of a Bulldogs varsity contest. Perhaps there is still time to rectify what seems to be a deplorable situation, upon further reflection.

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As might be expected of a cultured and well-educated lady owning and operating a respected wedding gown restoration business in Orange, Connecticut, for the past twenty years or so, Mom was not necessarily aware when the five-time NCAA champion University of Minnesota, the traditional collegiate powerhouse who were ranked # 2 in the nation, were drawn to play Ivy League underdog Yale University in the opening round of the annual NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament. But, as was the case with experts all across the country, Mom was rather confident that Grandma’s Hockey Team would skate right past the boys from New Haven wearing blue sweaters. And so the Bulldogs’ victory in overtime came as quite a shock to Mom, as did the fact that this year’s Frozen Four contestants UMass – Lowell and Qiunnipiac even have Division I hockey programs in the first place!

As for the 2013 NCAA Final featuring two schools from the greater New Haven area, there was never any question which side Mom would be favoring … “I’m sure that Quinnipiac are very nice people doing some wonderful things so I do not wish to be rude” was the official reply.

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Yale Siege Overwhelms # 3 UMass – Lowell In NCAA Semifinal


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UMass – Lowell center MICHAEL FALLON (20), the 21-year-old freshman from Glenview, Illinois, and his opposite number from YALE UNIVERSITY, Pittsburgh native and 23-year-old junior center JESSE ROOT (20), follow the puck into the corner during the closely-contested 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament semifinal clash that required overtime to decide at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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A very well-taken, to speak nothing of well-deserved, goal seven minutes into overtime settled a match that was far more one-sided than the final score could ever begin to reflect as surging Ivy Leaguers YALE UNIVERSITY outlasted the reigning Hockey East champion as well as # 3 ranked UNIVERSITY of MASSACHUSETTS – LOWELL 3-2 and secured its berth in the Final of the annual NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament for the first time in the 65-year history of the excitement-filled competition.

UMass – Lowell, the first-time conference champion who never before had advanced to the Frozen Four on three prior appearances at the NCAA’s prestigious post-season tourney, were in the midst of its most successful campaign ever having already won a school record 28 games this season. The River Hawks had been enjoying a good run of form as evidenced by the 6-1 wipe out of six-time NCAA champion Wisconsin and the 2-0 shutout of host New Hampshire in the Northeast Regional bracket. Facing off against pesky Yale in Pittsburgh, in fact, UMass – Lowell had won seven on the trot and not lost since dropping a 3-0 decision to Providence College in early March.

But the River Hawks, who had been seeking a fifth NCAA national championship title for a Hockey East school in the past six years, would be completely stifled at the semifinal stage of the NCAA tournament virtually the entire time by the relentless forechecking pressure of their Connecticut-based counterparts from the Eastern Collegiate Athletic Conference. UMass – Lowell consistently struggled to successfully move the puck out of its own end and had no answer whatsoever for the energy and work rate of the Bulldogs, who actually almost skated its way right out of this year’s Sweet 16 On Ice after turning in a dreadful performance at the final tournament of the ECAC post-season playoffs this spring. Having already upended both Minnesota and North Dakota, a pair of schools that have won a combined 12 NCAA national championship titles between them, however, Yale always looked like a very determined team skating against the River Hawks in the city where the Allegheny, Monongahela and Ohio water ways all converge.

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Yale University’s Canadian legionnaire ANTOINE LAGANIERE (28), the native of Quebec who netted 34 times in his last two seasons for the Ivy League champion Bulldogs, snaps the puck over UMass – Lowell netminder CONNOR HELLEBUYCK (31), the 19-year-old freshman who fashioned sensational numbers (24 ga, 1.37 avg, .952 save pct) this term, to score the second goal of this 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament semifinal match at the Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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Indeed, Yale capitalized on its very first power play opportunity of the semifinal after UMass – Lowell left wing SHAYNE THOMPSON was banished to the penalty box for high-sticking almost eleven minutes into the opening period. Bulldogs defenseman MITCH WITEK, the 20-year-old freshman from Downers Grove, Illinois, who was playing in just his twenty-first collegiate contest this term, picked an outstanding moment to register his very first career goal for the Yale University varsity with a long shot from the right point that was screened. Yale doubled the margin with less than a minute remaining in the first period when Canadian legionnaire ANTOINE LAGANIERE, the senior right wing from L’Ile-Cadieux, Quebec, who was destined to sign a free agent contract with the Anaheim Ducks of the National Hockey League, garnered a rebound in the slot and quickly flicked the puck over beleaguered River Hawks netminder CONNOR HELLEBUYCK to score the 15th goal of his senior season.

The Bulldogs continued to swarm all over the ice in the middle period but UMass – Lowell, to its tremendous credit, hauled themselves level with a deadly two-goal spurt in the second half of the second frame at the Consol Energy Center. River Hawks right wing DEREK ARNOLD, the homegrown junior from Foxboro who scored the only goal of the game in the 2013 Hockey East Final against Boston University, took a long, hopeful shot from the point that was redirected onto the stick of center RILEY WETMORE in front. The undrafted senior from Swanton, Vermont, who would soon join the Bridgeport Sound Tigers in the American Hockey League, easily beat Yale shot-stopper JEFF MALCOLM on the backhand to become UMass – Lowell’s joint top goal-scorer this season with 16 strikes at the 14:38 mark of the second period. Just 14 seconds later, JOSEPH PENDENZA, the homegrown junior center from Wilmington who finished as the River Hawks’ second-leading scorer with 38 points this season, took a nifty, no-look behind-the-back pass from freshman A.J. WHITE and whipped a wrist shot past Malcolm from right faceoff circle.

Beginning with the very moment the puck was dropped to begin play in the third period, the game-winning goal always seemed to be only a matter of time for dominant Yale University, who outgunned UMass – Lowell by a decisive 40-18 margin in the sixty minutes of regulation play and took all seven shots in the overtime period, as well. Hellebuyck, the 19-year-old freshman from Commerce, Michigan, who was the fifth round choice (# 130 overall) of the Winnipeg Jets at the 2012 NHL Draft last summer and honored as Hockey East Goaltender of the Year for the 2012/13 season, did all he could to hold the River Hawks in the NCAA semifinal at the Consol Energy Center. A hesitant moment of indecision at the blue line would prove to be lethal to UMass – Lowell, however.

River Hawks defenseman GREG AMLONG, the 21-year-old freshman from O’Fallon, Missouri, who appeared in just 23 of UMass – Lowell’s 41 NCAA contests this season, might have been more aggressive about challenging Yale captain ANDREW MILLER for a loose puck and, instead, offered only a meek poke check while skating backwards. The Bulldogs’ senior right wing from Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, easily won the duel with Amlong and blew right around the River Hawks’ rookie blueliner. A clever backhand from Miller right through the five-hole sent Yale to the NCAA Final for the very first time in the long and storied history of Bulldogs ice hockey.

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UMass – Lowell left wing RYAN MCGRATH (10), the 21-year-old freshman from O’Fallon, Missouri, who arrived in New England after skating two seasons for the Cedar Rapids RoughRiders in the United States Hockey League, and Yale’s senior Canadian netminder JEFF MALCOLM (33) focuses on the puck during the semifinal contest of the 2013 NCAA men’s ice hockey tournament witnessed by the crowd of 17,428 spectators at the Consol Energy Center.
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NCAA Frozen Four Semifinal
Consol Energy Center – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
YALE 3 – UMASS / LOWELL 2 … (overtime)

12:15 … YALE – Witek 1 (Cooper, Miller) – ppg
19:08 … YALE – Laganiere 15 (Killian)
34:38 … UML – Wetmore 16 (Arnold, Wilson)
34:52 … UML – Pendenza 15 (White, Holmstrom)
66:59 … YALE – Miller 17 (Cooper)

UMASS – LOWELL : Hellebuyck – Kamrass, Ruhwedel ; Amlong, Folin ; Houk, Suter – White, Pendenza, Holmstrom ; McGrath, Wetmore, Arnold ; Wilson, Fallon, Wallin ; Thompson, Wright, Chapie

YALE : Malcolm – Young, O’Gara ; Fallen, Obuchowski ; Dueck, Witek – Agostino, Root, Miller ; Orzetti, Bourbonais, Laganiere ; Balch, Wilson, Day ; Ruffolo, Cooper, Killian

Note — Canadian legionnaire CARSON COOPER, the freshman center from Bow Island, Alberta, had collected just one goal and three assists after skating in all of Yale’s first 35 contests this season prior to the 2013 NCAA semifinal match with UMass – Lowell … it was, of course, the Bulldogs rookie pivot who made a safe and solid play to bank the puck off the boards in center ice and provide senior captain ANDREW MILLER the chance to record what head coach KEITH ALLAIN, himself a former goaltender for Yale University in New Haven, has rightly designated as the single most important goal in the Ivy League school’s history.

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Instant Classic : Miller’s Move For Yale Vs UMass – Lowell


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